Bee Friendly Gardening


Bee Friendly Gardening “Garden to Help Beneficial Honey Bees stamp
As the honey bee population declines, there are simple steps you can take to help the bees, including buying local honey, growing flowers and more. Recent news reports have said that more than 25% of the U.S. honey bee population has disappeared over the last few winters. The effects of this can be felt in many areas, including the growth of many nut, fruits and berry crops – important produce for farmers and food manufacturers alike.
Why Are Honey Bees Important? Many U.S. crops depend on honey bees for pollination. As the honey bees gather pollen and nectar for their own survival, they pollinate crops such as apples, cranberries, melons and broccoli. Some crops, including blueberries and cherries, are 90 percent dependent on honey bee pollination and one crop in particular – almonds — depends entirely on the honey bee for pollination at bloom time. 
What’s Causing the Decline in Population? 

Researchers say that the decline in the bee population can be traced back to the following. 

  • Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). More than 35 states across the continental United States and in two provinces in Canada, Belgium, and Spain have reported this condition. CCD is thought to have claimed the lives of billions of honeybees around the world.
  • Varroa Mitesh. Accidentally introduced into the United States in 1987, these tiny brown parasites feed exclusively on honey bees.
    Viruses. Israeli AcuParalysis Virus (IAPV) has been linked with CCD.
  • Chemical Exposure. Tests on pollen in CCD-affected hives show levels of 45 different types of insecticides, fungicides and herbicides.
  • Lack of Nutrition. A limited supply of good pollen and nectar (due to drought) has had an effect on the decline of the honey bee population.

What Can I Do? 
bee_on_flower-2857
There are several things that home gardeners and concerned citizens can do to help the honey bee population. First, create a bee-friendly garden with plants that are attractive to honey bees. These include lavender, jasmine, rosemary, violets, thyme, blue bells, wisteria, cone flowers and sunflowers – common (and in some cases, local and native) perennials and herbs that can be grown easily and with little maintenance. The plants will also add beauty and diversity to your garden.” 
the rest of the article is in the link below 
http://insectsspiders.suite101.com/article.cfm/bee_friendly_gardening 

Buzzworthy Plants That Attract Bees 


“Buzz up! 

It isn’t difficult to make your yard, garden or even patio space a haven for beneficial bees. You’ll be helping these important insects, as well as bringing more nature to your backdoor. 

The greater the plant diversity, the more bees you will attract and support. Always try to choose as many native plants as possible, and consult with nursery staff or other experts to find vegetation that will thrive in your specific conditions. 

Here is a partial list of tried-and-true bee attractors: 

Annuals 

Asters 
Calliopsis 
Clover 
Marigolds 
Poppies 
Sunflowers 
Zinnias 

Perennials 

Buttercups 
Clematis 
Cosmos 
Crocuses 
Dahlias 
Echinacea 
English Ivy 
Foxglove 
Geraniums 
Germander 
Globe Thistle 
Hollyhocks 
Hyacinth 
Rock Cress 
Roses 
Sedum 
Snowdrops 
Squills 
Tansy 
Yellow Hyssop 

Garden Plants 

Blackberries 
Cantaloupe 
Cucumbers 
Gourds 
Peppers 
Pumpkins 
Raspberries 
Squash 
Strawberries 
Watermelons 
Wild Garlic 

Herbs 

Bee Balm 
Borage 
Catnip 
Coriander/Cilantro 
Fennel 
Lavender 
Mints 
Rosemary 
Sage 
Thyme 

Shrubs 

Blueberry 
Butterfly Bush 
Button Bush 
Honeysuckle 
Indigo 
Privet 

Trees 

Alder 
American Holly 
Basswood 
Black Gum 
Black Locust 
Buckeyes 
Catalpa 
Eastern Redbud 
Fruit Trees (especially Crabapples) 
Golden Rain Tree 
Hawthorns 
Hazels 
Linden 
Magnolia 
Maples 
Mountain Ash 
Sycamore 
Tulip 
Poplar 
Willows” 
http://www.thedailygreen.com/going-green/tips/2790 

Making a Wildlife Garden 
http://www.enfo.ie/Making%20A%20Wildlife%20Garden%20pdf.pdf 

Great flowers start with pollination, and for that you need bees. honeybee
http://www.gardenersworld.com/plants/features/plants-for-bees/